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JS++ 0.4.2 Release - Upgraded With Modular Design, Dead Code Elimination, and Multiple Code Editors

JavaScript++ (JS++) programming language from Onux has received some major updates this week including modular design, dead code elimination, and multiple code editors. JS++ is still in a developer preview mode but it is all set for web and mobile development. JS++ being the superset of JavaScript for risk-free usage of its libraries while allowing compile-time checking. In the latest version of JS++ 0.4.2, it features a modular keyword and approves modular design. Onux has confirmed that JS++ modules are connected at compile time and can be resolved in all cases. The upgrade will empower the user as the function deployed by him/her will be in the final compiled mode and the process is dead code elimination. The upgrade will not compile all unused code  into the final generated output. The upgrade has also allowed integration of multiple code editors, including Sublime Text, Notepad++, Visual Studio Code, GitHub Atom, and GNU Emacs, along with improvement in Windows integration. In JS++ Official blog, JS++ designer Roger Poon explained, "One of the biggest pain points in JavaScript is that you need to include the entire jQuery library just to use one function. With npm and the 'micro-library' revolution, JavaScript code has grown and grown in size." Onux believes that type safety is the main differentiator of JS++ in relation with alternatives like TypeScript, a superset of JavaScript, and Facebook Flow, which adds static typing to JavaScript. While JS++ is still in an early developer preview beta. Poon has hinted that the language will be feature-complete by March of next year and will be known as version 0.4.7. The upcoming JS++ 0.4.3 version is expected to release later this year with the focus on class-based OOP.
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JS++ 0.4.2 Release - Upgraded With Modular Design, Dead Code Elimination, and Multiple Code Editors

Geneva Clark
What's New
20th Oct, 2016
JS++ 0.4.2 Release - Upgraded With Modular Design, Dead Code Elimination, and Multiple Code Editors

JavaScript++ (JS++) programming language from Onux has received some major updates this week including modular design, dead code elimination, and multiple code editors.

JS++ is still in a developer preview mode but it is all set for web and mobile development. JS++ being the superset of JavaScript for risk-free usage of its libraries while allowing compile-time checking. In the latest version of JS++ 0.4.2, it features a modular keyword and approves modular design. Onux has confirmed that JS++ modules are connected at compile time and can be resolved in all cases.

The upgrade will empower the user as the function deployed by him/her will be in the final compiled mode and the process is dead code elimination. The upgrade will not compile all unused code  into the final generated output. The upgrade has also allowed integration of multiple code editors, including Sublime Text, Notepad++, Visual Studio Code, GitHub Atom, and GNU Emacs, along with improvement in Windows integration.

In JS++ Official blog, JS++ designer Roger Poon explained, "One of the biggest pain points in JavaScript is that you need to include the entire jQuery library just to use one function. With npm and the 'micro-library' revolution, JavaScript code has grown and grown in size."

Onux believes that type safety is the main differentiator of JS++ in relation with alternatives like TypeScript, a superset of JavaScript, and Facebook Flow, which adds static typing to JavaScript. While JS++ is still in an early developer preview beta. Poon has hinted that the language will be feature-complete by March of next year and will be known as version 0.4.7. The upcoming JS++ 0.4.3 version is expected to release later this year with the focus on class-based OOP.

Geneva

Geneva Clark

Blog Author
Geneva specializes in back-end web development and has always been fascinated by the dynamic part of the web. Talk to her about modern web applications and she and loves to nerd out on all things Ruby on Rails.

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